Dietary Intervention

Sep 6, 09:18 pm

The dietary intervention in the asymptomatic phase nutritional treatment is essential to optimize the quality of life of people with AIDS. Malnutrition of the person with AIDS, one of the main causes of death, is an aggregate disease that worsens the evolution of AIDS to result in a significant decrease of the defenses and increase the risk of major infections. AIDS is the disease of no immediate appearance, appearing at a period that varies between 2 and 10 years after infection with HIV. The period of time between infection and the onset of symptoms is called asymptomatic phase. The asymptomatic phase is characterized by no symptoms characteristic of the disease and obvious. However, this phase is not devoid of other problems but are not considered clear symptoms of AIDS, that caused discomfort and complications. For more information see this site: Rand Paul. This phase most typical disorders are emotional, derivatives of the medication and the nutritional. 1.

Emotional disorders: These alterations can cause mainly gastrointestinal disturbances, stress, headaches, respiratory infections and febrile syndromes. 2. Celebrity trainer has plenty of information regarding this issue. The disorders due to medication vary depending on the applied treatment. 3. Nutritional disorders: malnutrition is one of the first effects that appear in those infected with HIV.

Malnutrition is directly related to a decline in immunity and with a greater probability of occurrence of the infection, so it is essential get good nutrition to delay the onset of the disease as far as possible and achieve a good quality of life. Found in a study of the school of public health from Johns Hopkins University, that persons affected by HIV experience weight loss equivalent to 10% of its usual body weight during the time period comprised between 3 and 9 months prior to the symptomatic onset of AIDS. There is also evidence that people who lose that 10% of weight are up to 50% more than likely to die earlier than those who maintained their weight. Although during this phase the symptoms have not been submitted it is essential to conduct a proper nutrition to ensure a good performance. Dietary intervention must not be conceived simply as a diet to follow, but as a process with preset objectives that include human attention and a careful plan of learning by the person. The goals of the dietary intervention in the asymptomatic phase can be summarized in rethinking the power of the infected person, since it tends to be incorrect, and get to follow a balanced diet. Even so, these objectives can be broken down in several points: provide proper nutritional education so that the infected person will know your dietary requirements and how to meet them. Ensure that the individual has the nutritional content closer to their real needs. Encourage the assimilation of nutrients. Prevent infection through contaminated food. Try to get a good level of quality of life and social integration the person actively. The achievement of each of these objectives is directly related to the other points.
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